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CHECK THE CALENDAR OF BONUS SYMPOSIA 2017-

'BONUS call 2017: Synthesis' opens on 9 August
BONUS briefing 26
BONUS making a difference: Impacting on scientific excellence and policymaking in the Baltic

Briefing 26_BONUS_impact
BONUS briefing 27
Insights into BONUS successes:
10 cases from a 10-year journey

Briefing 27_10_cases

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Newest: BONUS BSSC session: Science meets Policy, 15 June 20017


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News from projects

11.07.2017 Apply now for PhD course in October 2017: "Molecular Analyses of Bacterioplankton Composition and Function"

The BONUS BLUEPRINT project offers a PhD course which is coming up in October 2017: "Molecular Analyses of Bacterioplankton Composition and Function". For more information and instructions on how to apply, please click on the news item and visit the listed website.

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30.06.2017 Download the programme of the first BONUS Symposium taking place in Tallinn on 17-19 October 2017

The first BONUS Symposium titled 'Science delivery for sustainable use of the Baltic Sea living resources', will take place in Tallinn on 17-19 October 2017.

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15.06.2017 Register for BaltGene 2017 – workshop on genetics in Baltic Sea management, 21-22 September, Stockholm

How can the growing knowledge on genetics help ensure the future of Baltic Sea species and ecosystems? This is the focus of a workshop organized by BONUS BAMBI in Stockholm this September.

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Project blogs

20.07.2017 12:00EAERE 2017 (BONUS BALTICAPP - Race Against Eutrophication Blog) Matti Sihvonen

Hi all!

 

In this blog I will tell about the EAERE conference held in Athens. First I must emphasize that it was really hot out there. I have never experienced such a hot temperatures (35-45 degrees) in my life before. Luckily the air conditioning worked just well in the conference places and all the other facilities were also very well handled. Overall the conference was a good and learning experience. I witnessed some great presentations and speeches. I guess that the best presentations (among those I saw) focused on micro-econometric data analysis and intertemporal optimization. I guess that it was particularly beneficial to see the overall level and current trends in environmental economics. It appears that macro models and everything related to climate change is now cool. Also behavioral and network economics appear to be very hot fields right now. My subject of interest, namely empirical agricultural production analysis and agri-environmental modelling seems rather uninteresting subject currently, to say at least. But that’s ok, I keep calm and continue working with my PhD anyway. At least I am still excited about it (now that I’m working with the second paper)!   

There was also one very good plenary speech, which handled multiple layers of uncertainty, including model selection uncertainty. I found this particularly interesting, of course, because I have been struggling with uncertainty (regarding particularly model selection) issues for so long time now. I actually started to loose my interest in structural uncertainty entirely. But now it seems that it might actually be the key to get my first paper published. I got this idea that perhaps I should reframe the problem so that the focus is, again, shifted to these structural uncertainty issues within the optimization problem. It would be absolutely perfect if I could find a way to formulate the profit maximization problem analytically so that the parametric and model selection uncertainty would be taken into account explicitly. This, however, might be very challenging and perhaps beyond my abilities, given the time limits at least. But in any case, I should stress the structural uncertainty, because it appears to be generally interesting topic after all; for a moment I thought I was the last person on earth interested in it.

My presentation in the conference went just fine. Needless to say I was very nervous about it. The audience wasn’t large, which was just fine. One reason for the lack of audience, among the fact that nobody is generally interest in empirically bio-economic modelling in the context of agriculture (or fertilizers (!)), might have been that it was a last parallel session before the dinner and the busses started to leave just after the session. I guess most of the people went to hotel to rest and get ready for the evening. Anyway, I got some comments for some Chinese senior researcher, which was very nice, although I couldn’t understand her comments at the moment, because of the very challenging accent. However, after reprocessing the echoes in my ears for a while I understood what she said. Anyway, the comments were very trivial and I’m a little bit upset that I couldn’t respond to those at the moment, but better luck next time perhaps. I also was a discussant for a one presentation in our session. I think it went well and the situation resolved rather nicely in the end. The dinner, by the way, was great and we had very good time. Even the head master of the Greek bank was there to give his speech, which was super funny (the speech I mean).

I must say that I didn’t seize the opportunity to network with foreign people at all, which was a little bit unfortunate. The thing is that there was such a huge amount of Finnish environmental economists there that most of the time we just chatted with each other in some isolated corner. And during the dinner we also had Finnish tables. Luckily some German researches shared a table with us in the end. Thus, some international communications did take place, but not much. Anyway, it was a very nice event and all. I really hope that I could participate the next one also (which will be held in Gothenburg), but it will be much more unlikely because it will be a world conference so the competition will be much tougher. I know for a fact that the second paper will be much more interesting in terms of environmental economics than the first one, but will it be enough, remains to be seen. It would be nice to see the Gothenburg because it is capital if Scandinavian Heavy Metal!

 

Thus, Rock on and see you next month!

 

Bets regards: Matti Sihvonen 

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05.07.2017 15:03How can Sweden help bridge the gap between innovation and commercialisation in the Baltics? (BONUS RETURN) Karina Barquet & Ylva Rylander

The environmental destruction of the Baltic Sea continues to be a problem affecting 60 million people. There is a need to enable commercialisation and implementation of fair technologies that will contribute to win-win solutions for Sweden and the entire Baltic Sea region.

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Strategic research agenda

BONUS SRA
Developed together with over 800 stakeholders across the Baltic Sea region, this serves as the backbone of the BONUS programme.


Projects

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Find out more about projects funded from BONUS calls open 2012-2015, as well as BONUS+ pilot projects implemented 2009-2011.


Participants

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Find out more about implementing BONUS projects, including scientific and financial management and other information. 

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Young scientists

Hugh Kearns at YSC2017
Previous BONUS Young Scientist Club convened on 12 June 2017 at the 11th BSSC in Rostock, Germany. 

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Events

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In horizon: The tenth anniversary of BONUS, the eleventh Baltic Sea Science Congress and the sixth BONUS Young Scientist Club...

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Publications

BONUS publications
BONUS reports, newsletter, briefings, brochure and other can be obtained in soft copy downloads or in hard copy by post.


Call information

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BONUS call 2015: Blue Baltic closed in March 2016 for independent evaluations. The final outcome of projects to be funded by late 2016.

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